Introduction to Forensic Epidemiology (FOCUS, Volume 2.5)

Fee:None
Length: 40 minutes
Description:This issue of FOCUS provides an overview of forensic epidemiology and describes the ways in which it is an important part of many criminal investigations.
To Access and Complete This Training:

To create a login ID and password for the NCIPH Training Website, click on the Create An Account link. If you have previously created an account, click on the Login to Training Link. Please read over the information on this page first.

This training was developed with the support of the UNC Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (UNC PERLC), a funded project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC Cooperative Agreement 1U90TP000415).
PERLC

Learning Objectives

Training Personnel

Author:

Sally Mountcastle, PhD, MSPH

Reviewers:

E. Danielle Rentz, MPH

Amy Nelson, MPH, PhD

FOCUS Workgroup

The author(s) and reviewer(s) of this training have no personal financial relationships with commercial interests relevant to this presentation to disclose. Author, narrator, reviewer affiliations listed were current at the time of training development.

Competencies and Capability Functions Addressed

This training addresses selected applied epidemiology, core public health, and public health preparedness and response competencies and public health preparedness capability functions. (Please note: The competencies included on this site are just a few of the public health competencies which have been established. Training participants may find alignment between this training and other competency sets not included on this site.)

Public Health Preparedness & Response Core Competencies
1.3. Facilitate collaboration with internal and external emergency response partners.

References

  1. Last JM, ed. A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3rd Edition. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, Inc; 1995.
  2. Goodman RA. Basics of Public Health/Epidemiologic Investigations for Law Enforcement. Presented at Forensic Epidemiology Training Course; November 2-5, 2002; Chapel Hill, NC.
  3. Loue S. Forensic Epidemiology: A Comprehensive Guide for Legal and Epidemiology Professionals. Carbondale, IL; Southern Illinois University Press; 1999.
  4. Jernigan DB, Raghunathan PL, Bell BP, Brechner R, et al. Investigation of bioterrorism-related Anthrax, United States, 2001: Epidemiologic findings. Emerging Infect Dis 2002;8:1019-1028.
  5. Martinez D. Law Enforcement and Forensic Epidemiology. Presented at Forensic Epidemiology Training Course; November 2-5, 2002; Chapel Hill, NC.
  6. Carus WS. Bioterrorism and Biocrimes: The Illicit Use of Biological Agents Since 1900. Washington, DC: Center for Counterproliferation Research, National Defense University; February 2001. Available at: http://www.ndu.edu/centercounter/Full_Doc.pdf. Accessed August 8, 2005.

To Access and Complete This Training:

To create a login ID and password for the NCIPH Training Website, click on the Create An Account link. If you have previously created an account, click on the Login to Training Link. Please read over the information on this page first.