Forensic Epidemiology Part 1

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Fee:None
Length: 10 minutes
Description:This presentation by Pia MacDonald, PhD, MPH, Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Project Director of the Center for Public Health Preparedness and Sally Mountcastle, MSPH, PhD candidate in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will give you an overview of both Epidemiology and Forensic Epidemiology.
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Learning Objectives

Training Personnel

Authors and Narrators:

Pia MacDonald

Sally Mountcastle

NCIPH Reviewer:

Jennifer Horney, MPH

The author(s) and reviewer(s) of this training have no personal financial relationships with commercial interests relevant to this presentation to disclose. Author, narrator, reviewer affiliations listed were current at the time of training development.

Competencies and Capability Functions Addressed

This training addresses selected applied epidemiology, core public health, and public health preparedness and response competencies and public health preparedness capability functions. (Please note: The competencies included on this site are just a few of the public health competencies which have been established. Training participants may find alignment between this training and other competency sets not included on this site.)


References

Carus WS. Bioterrorism and biocrimes: The illicit use of biological agents since 1900. Center for Counterproliferation Research, National Defense University, Washington, D.C. Paper in progress, February 2001 revision.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Accessed at http://www.cdc.gov.

Goodman RA. Presentation entitled Basics of Public Health/Epidemiologic Investigations for Law Enforcement at the Forensic Epidemiology Training Course. The Friday Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina November 2-5, 2002.

Jernigan DB, Raghunathan PL, Bell BP, Brechner R, et al. Investigation of bioterrorism-related Anthrax, United States, 2001: Epidemiologic findings. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2002;8:1019-28.

Last JM, ed. A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 3rd Edition, New York, Oxford University Press, Inc., 1995

Martinez D. Presentation entitled Law Enforcement and Forensic Epidemiology at the Forensic Epidemiology Training Course. The Friday Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina November 2-5, 2002.

Moore J. Responding to biological threats: The public health system's communicable disease control authority. Health Law Bulletin 2001;78:1-10.

National Institute of Justice. Accessed at http://www.ncjrs.org/txtfiles1/nij/178280.txt.

N.C. General Statutes. Accessed at http://www.ncleg.net/homePage.pl

Reingold AL. Outbreak Investigations-A Perspective. Emerging Infectious Diseases 1998;4:21-7.

Scenario I - Suspicious letter in DeKalb County. Working group exercise distributed at the Forensic Epidemiology Training Course. The Friday Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina November 2-5, 2002.

Scenario II - Anthrax in Florida. Working group exercise distributed at the Forensic Epidemiology Training Course. The Friday Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina November 2-5, 2002.

Scenario III - Salmonellosis in Oregon. Working group exercise distributed at the Forensic Epidemiology Training Course. The Friday Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina November 2-5, 2002.