Distinguishing Public Health Ethics from Medical Ethics (Public Health Ethics, Module 1)

Fee:None
Length: 35 minutes
Description:Ethics in medicine has been studied longer and is more developed than ethics in public health. But principles of medical ethics do not provide the needed direction for common ethical situations in public health.

Using a case study of a water fluoridation debate in a California county, this module presents: the relationship between theoretical and practical ethics; the application of medical ethics to the fluoridation debate; and then the application of public health ethics to the fluoridation debate.

This module, developed in partnership with the Program in Public Health Ethics at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health, is part of the "Public Health Ethics" training series developed to promote the ethical practice of public health by teaching about the ethical principles of public health and by providing resources for creating an ethical climate in public health agencies and schools of public health.
To Access and Complete This Training:

To create a login ID and password for the NCIPH Training Website, click on the Create An Account link. If you have previously created an account, click on the Login to Training Link. Please read over the information on this page first.

This training was developed with the support of the Southeast Public Health Training Center (Southeast PHTC), a funded project of the Bureau of Health Professions in the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA Cooperative Agreement 6UB6HP20182).
SPHTC

Learning Objectives

Training Personnel

Author and Narrator:

James C. Thomas, MPH, PhD
Associate Professor of Epidemiology
Deputy Director for HIV and Infectious Diseases
MEASURE Evaluation Project, Carolina Population Center

NCIPH Reviewer:

Tanya Montoya, MPH, MCHES

Subject Matter Expert Reviewer:

James C. Thomas, MPH, PhD

The author(s) and reviewer(s) of this training have no personal financial relationships with commercial interests relevant to this presentation to disclose. Author, narrator, reviewer affiliations listed were current at the time of training development.

Competencies and Capability Functions Addressed

This training addresses selected applied epidemiology, core public health, and public health preparedness and response competencies and public health preparedness capability functions. (Please note: The competencies included on this site are just a few of the public health competencies which have been established. Training participants may find alignment between this training and other competency sets not included on this site.)

  • This training does not map to any of the competencies currently included on this website.

References

American Medical Association. Principles of Medical Ethics. June 2001. Retrieved May 18, 2004, from http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/physician-resources/medical-ethics/code-medical-ethics/principles-medical-ethics.page

American Public Health Association. Principles of the Ethical Practice of Public Health. Retrieved November 15, 2007,from http://www.apha.org/NR/rdonlyres/1CED3CEA-287E-4185-9CBD-BD405FC60856/0/ethicsbrochure.pdf

Germano, CD. Ask Health Experts for Their View. August 4, 2002. Retrieved May 18, 2004, from http://oce.sph.unc.edu/phethics/germono.htm

Lebacqz, K. Six Theories of Justice: Perspectives from Philosophical and Theological Ethics. Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress Publishers, 1986.

Watterson, B. The Calvin and Hobbes Tenth Anniversary Book. Kansas City, Missouri: United Press Syndicate Company, 1995, (page 185).

Watterson, B. There's Treasure Everywhere. Kansas City, Missouri: United Press Syndicate Company, 1996, (page 17).

To Access and Complete This Training:

To create a login ID and password for the NCIPH Training Website, click on the Create An Account link. If you have previously created an account, click on the Login to Training Link. Please read over the information on this page first.