Responder Health and Safety (Basics of Public Health Preparedness, Module 5)

Fee:None
Length: 25 minutes
Description:This module describes the four main functions of responder health and safety with a specific focus on public health threats likely to occur.
To Access and Complete This Training:

To create a login ID and password for the NCIPH Training Website, click on the Create An Account link. If you have previously created an account, click on the Login to Training Link. Please read over the information on this page first.

This training was developed with the support of the UNC Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (UNC PERLC), a funded project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC Cooperative Agreement 1U90TP000415). The UNC PERLC gratefully acknowledges the contributions of the West Virginia Center for Threat Preparedness and the North Carolina Public Health Preparedness and Response Branch in shaping the content and framework for this training.

Learning Objectives

Training Personnel

Author:

Meredith Davis, MPH, CPH

Narrator:

Allison George, MPH, MCHES

NCIPH Reviewer:

Rachel Wilfert, MD, MPH, CPH

Subject Matter Expert Reviewers:

Susan Sullivan, RN-BC, MS, Public Health Nurse Consultant, Training/Exercise Facilitator, Public Health Preparedness and Response Branch Central Regional Office, North Carolina Division of Public Health

Jennifer MacFarquhar, RN, MPH, CIC, Career Epidemiology Officer, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, North Carolina Division of Public Health

Additional Expertise Provided by:

Sebra Jenkins, RN, Responder Health and Safety Consultant, Center for Threat Preparedness, WV Bureau for Public Health

The author(s) and reviewer(s) of this training have no personal financial relationships with commercial interests relevant to this presentation to disclose. Author, narrator, reviewer affiliations listed were current at the time of training development.

Competencies and Capability Functions Addressed

This training addresses selected applied epidemiology, core public health, and public health preparedness and response competencies and public health preparedness capability functions. (Please note: The competencies included on this site are just a few of the public health competencies which have been established. Training participants may find alignment between this training and other competency sets not included on this site.)

Public Health Preparedness Capabilities
Capability 14, Function 1: Identify responder safety and health risks
Capability 14, Function 2: Identify safety and personal protective needs
Public Health Preparedness & Response Core Competencies
1.2. Manage behaviors associated with emotional responses in self and others.
4.2. Employ protective behaviors according to changing conditions, personal limitations, and threats.

References

Balicer RD, Omer SB, Barnett DJ, Everly GS. Local public health workers' perceptions toward responding to an influenza pandemic. BMC Public Health. 2006, 6:99.

CDC. Immunization of Health-care Workers: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HCIPAC). Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1997;46(RR-18):1-42.

CDC. Public Health Preparedness Capabilities. March 2011.

Chaffee, Mary. Willingness of Health Care Personnel to Work in a Disaster: An Integrative Review of the Literature. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. 2009;3:42-56.

Davis and Blanchard. Are Local Health Responders Ready for Biological and Chemical Terrorism? Rand. 2002.

Hilliard and Sorensen. Responder safety in hurricanes. National Hurricane Conference. 2010.

Swygard, H, Stafford, RE. Effects on Health of Volunteers Deployed during a Disaster. American Surgeon. 2009; 75 (9): 747-752.

Houser AN, Jackson BA, Bartis JT, Peterson DJ. Emergency Responder Injuries and Fatalities: An Analysis of Surveillance Data. NIOSH, March 2004.

Perrin et al. Differences in PTSD Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors Among World Trade Center Disaster Rescue and Recovery Workers. September 2007; Am J Psychiatry 164:9.

Reissman and Howard. Responder Safety and Health: Preparing for Future Disasters. Mount Sinai J of Med. 2008; 75:135-141.

To Access and Complete This Training:

To create a login ID and password for the NCIPH Training Website, click on the Create An Account link. If you have previously created an account, click on the Login to Training Link. Please read over the information on this page first.